Increasing Faculty Curiosity: The DataUp Program at Johnson C. Smith University


Johnson C. Smith faculty and staff flanked by the Software Carpentries instructors.  Faculty and staff members explored shell, git, Matlab, and JupyterHub during the Oct 18-19, 2018 workshop.

Oftentimes, learning and education are discussed from the perspective of students. Unintentionally, excluding the fact that faculty have a natural interest in and curiosity for lifelong learning. Johnson C. Smith University’s DataUp institutional workshop attracted faculty and staff from diverse departments, including Psychology, Mathematics, and Library Services and IT. Over a two-day workshop, attendees discussed shell, git, and the interactive notebook JupyterHub. One learner noted that ‘it is [always] great to attend new workshops…it reminds you how students feel when learning new topics’. Many learners were new to the concepts but were eager to ask questions and find points of connectivity for their respective departments. By the middle of the first day, laughter and collaboration erupted throughout the session as individuals became more open to the concepts and asking questions. 

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Building Student Capacity: DataUp Program at Texas A&M University – Kingsville


Learners, faculty members, and Carpentries instructors at the close of the Texas A&M University – Kingsville’s (TAMUK) Python/JupyterHub 2-day workshop.  The DataUp program will host a 2-day workshop at each of the 8 participating institutions.

On September 28 – 29, the DataUp program hosted a 2-day workshop at Texas A&M University – Kingsville, a historically Hispanic serving institution in Southern Texas. Arriving on the first day, a sense of eagerness buzzed throughout the classroom. Not only from the learners but also from the hosting faculty members. Faculty member, Dr. Min Zhoung, Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering, noted that oftentimes learners tend to stray away from analytical or data science opportunities because of a ‘math or computational’ fear. The Carpentries instructors provided engaging and supportive hands-on Python & SQL tutorials and exercises utilizing the shared notebook, JupyterHub. Although there were learners of varying stages of coding knowledge and expertise, numerous students stated their excitement and gratitude for the workshop. One young woman who works in the TAMUK’s President’s office noted that her “projects took considerable time to set up and run, but with the tips from the workshop she can cut her project time down significantly”. The DataUp program’s mission, in part, is to increase capacities for and usage of data science tools. Learners noted that similar workshops moved either too fast or too slow, but this workshop provided the opportunity for all learners to ask questions and learn subtleties to maximize Python and JupyterHub. This workshop was timely for a young man attending a job interview the following week providing him the opportunity to ‘brush up on his verbiage and techniques’.

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Students Have A Buzzing Excitement for Data Science: DataUp Workshop at the University Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras

The South Hub created the DataUp program to enable researchers and educators to teach data science students and prepare them for future data-intensive and data-enabled environments.  On August 18, 35 learners packed the room, at the University of Puerto Rico- Rio Piedras (UPRRP), to participate in a hands-on workshop focused on data management and analysis for genomics research.  Students learned best practices for the organization of bioinformatics projects and data, use of command line utilities, use of command line tools to analyze sequence quality and perform variant calling, and connecting to and using cloud computing.   This workshop, taught in English and Spanish, created such a buzz that a waitlist was created.  The waitlist included 13 individuals!

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Call for Papers: Special Journal Issue on Social Cybersecurity

The South Big Data Hub Security, Network Analysis, and Social Media Working Group organized a workshop in March and recommended a special issue on social cybersecurity as a deliverable. From that recommendation, Computational and Mathematical Organization Theory has announced a special journal issue on social cybersecurity with the working group co-chairs as editors.

Kathleen Carley, PhD, of Carnegie Mellon University, Nitin Agarwal, PhD, of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, and Lea Shanley, PhD, of the South Big Data Hub invite submissions for consideration. A letter of intent should be sent to Dr. Carley at kathleen.carley@cs.cmu.edu by August 1, 2018 for consideration.

If you are interested in joining the South Hub Security Working Group, please email Nitin Agarwal or Karl Gustafson, and be sure to indicate why you are interested in membership in your request to join.

See the full Call for Papers below:

We are pleased to announce a special issue of the journal Computational and Mathematical Organization Theory on Social Cyber‐Security. As noted in Carley et al 2018:

“Social Cyber‐security is an emerging scientific area focused on the science to characterize, understand, and forecast cyber‐mediated changes in human behavior, social, cultural and political outcomes, and to build the cyber‐infrastructure needed for society to persist in its essential character in a cyber‐mediated information environment under changing conditions, actual or imminent social cyber‐threats. An example is the technology and theory needed to assess, predict and mitigate instances of individual influence and community manipulation through alterations in, or control of, the cyber‐mediated information environment via bots, cyborgs and humans.

Fundamental to this area is the perspective that we need to maintain and preserve a free and open information environment in which ideas can be exchanged freely, the information source is known, disinformation and false data are identifiable and minimized, and technology is not used to distort public opinion. This relies on the notion that movement of information should not compromise the infrastructure, and that actors should not be able to compromise the cyber‐ environment so as to unduly influence or manipulate individuals, groups and communities. Types of events to be prevented include viral retweeting of messages containing images which if downloaded release malware, or the use of bots to manipulate groups into accepting fake news as real.”

We anticipate that all articles will be computational social science papers and draw on both social science and computer science or computational techniques.

Possible topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Diffusion of disinformation through social
  • Community formation in cyber‐space.
  • Study of a digital democracy
  • Gangs’ or extremist groups use of social media for
  • Social evolution of bot
  • Modeling deviant cyber‐mediated
  • Identification and classification of intent behind deviant social media
  • Viral sharing of messages containing malware in any social

Articles not of interest include those related to privacy, cyber‐security (technical only), pure machine learning papers, and descriptions of, or evaluations of, software tools. If the paper focuses on computational model development, it is required that the authors provide in depth treatment on model explanation.

A letter of intent should be sent to Dr. Kathleen M. Carley at Kathleen.carley@cs.cmu.edu. It should list a tentative title, authors and full affiliations, abstract, keywords, and three potential reviewers.

The actual paper should be submitted through the Springer website at: https://www.springer.com/business+&+management/journal/10588.

Make sure to select the special issue on Social Cyber‐Security.

Timeline

  • Letter of intent due: August 1, 2018
  • Paper due: October 1, 2018
  • Revisions due: December 1, 2018
  • Electronic version, which appears first, will be online by end of January 2019

Kathleen M. Carley, Guido Cervone, Nitin Agarwal, Huan Liu, 2018, “Social Cyber‐Security,” In Proceedings of the International Conference SBP‐BRiMS 2018, Halil Bisgin, Ayaz Hyder, Chris Dancy, and Robert Thomson (Eds.) July 10‐13, 2018 Washington DC, Springer.

South Big Data Hub partners on development of new nationwide data storage network under NSF grant

The Open Storage Network will enable researchers to manage data more efficiently than ever before.


The South Big Data Hub is one of four regional big data hub partners awarded a $1.8 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for the initial development of a data storage network over the next two years. A collaborative team will combine their expertise, facilities, and research challenges to develop the Open Storage Network (OSN). The OSN will enable academic researchers across the nation to work with and share their data more efficiently than ever before, according to the NSF announcement.  Continue reading

Strategies for hiring and maintaining a diverse data scientists workforce

RTI’s Kristina Brunelle (left) moderates a panel discussion with Amy Roussel, RTI (center); Gracie Johnson-Lopez, Diversity and HR Solutions (right); and Sackeena Gordon-Jones, Transformation Edge and NC State University (on screen).

Data science is hot. That’s good news for workers with data science skills. It also means organizations competing to hire data scientists need to understand how to recruit talent that will solve their data science challenges and contribute to creating a productive and diverse workforce.  Continue reading

Data Education–Inclusivity is the Word

 

As organizational and societal decisions become more data-driven academic institutions, industry, and government officials continuously identify data literacy as an important skillset for individuals currently in and entering the workforce.  Unfortunately, a dearth of qualified data literate employees exists producing a need for effective data science education and training for undergraduates.  Continue reading

Data Science and Emerging Economies: Students Attend #YCBS2018

 

Top Left: The South Hub SNAP award recipients with the Co-Executive Director, Renata-Rawlings Goss and an organizer of the Young CEOs Business Summit. Top Right: South Hub SNAP award recipients, Abdoulaye Gueye, Favour Ori, and Sylvester Ogbonda, pose with their awards during the Young CEOs Business Summit Awards Banquet. (R) The South Hub SNAP award recipients with the Co-Executive Director, Renata-Rawlings Goss, organizers of the Young CEOs Business Summit, and presenters.

The South Hub continually identifies opportunities to expose students and professionals to data science.  For example, the South Hub awarded five student’s registration fellowships through the SNAP-DS program, “Stimulating New Activities and Projects in Data Science,” to attend the Young CEOs Business Summit’s (YCBS) 2018 Annual Summit in Atlanta.  The South Hub developed the SNAP-DS program to provide travel support, student stipends, or registration fellowships for students to attend data-related workshops, conferences, and projects, such as the Young CEO’s Business Summit, that expose students to data science and the ways data science can better societies and businesses.   Continue reading

Master of Data Analytics Program at UCF hosts first ever Women in Data Science Conference

Dan Eilen, associate director  of the UCF  MS Data Analytics Program, and Shafaq Chaudhry, assistant director of Research Information Systems, at the recent Women in Data Science conference

ORLANDO, FLA – The University of Central Florida Master of Science in Data Analytics program hosted its first ever Women in Data Science Conference on March 5, 2018. This technology conference was held on the university campus and afterwards talks from Stanford were live streamed at over 100 satellite locations. The panel discussed data science research, career opportunities, as well as tips, tools and knowledge in hopes of educating and encouraging other women in data analytics.  Continue reading

Reflections on the NIST/IEEE/ORCA Federated Cloud Workshop

Both the South Big Data Hub and West Big Data Hub provided sponsorship for the NIST/IEEE/ORCA Federated Cloud Workshop, held on March 21-22, 2018, in Gaithersburg, MD. The workshop was chaired by:

  • Robert Bohn, Program Manager, NIST Cloud Computing Program (NCCP) Federated Cloud Conceptual Architecture, and Chair IEEE P2302;
  • Craig Lee, Chair, NCCP Federated Cloud Conceptual Architecture, and The Aerospace Corporation; and,
  • Khalil Yazdi, Chair of Open Research Cloud Alliance (ORCA).

Continue reading